Wadsworth teacher tells of experience with the new normal of online teaching

BY JACKSON KERLEY

Students and the unemployed are not the only groups being affected by the sudden onset of Covid-19. Many things teachers know about teaching in the classroom has changed. Mrs. Parsons’ story is one of many teachers that have been affected.

From the time that she wakes up, to how she conducts her class and family life throughout the day, it has all changed.

Before the lock-down, she had a common schedule for a working parent: wake up early, get the kids ready, go to work.

“I usually got up around 4:15 in the morning,” said Parsons.  “I had to get all my kids up and dressed and out the door by 6:45”. 

However, with schools moving to remote learning, she spends her mornings homeschooling her kids. 

Mrs. Parsons spends her school days in her new “class room”, offering times to her students to meet with them if they need help. Photo Courtesy of Mrs. Parsons

After having helped her kids with their school work, she goes into math teacher mode. Her afternoons have changed from teaching her hundred plus students to creating assignments and preparing videos for her students by working with Mr. Hannah to make videos explaining the notes, trying to mimic the normal class experience. 

Her evenings used to be one of the busiest parts of her day since she was normally having to run her kids around. But with the stay at home order having everyone stuck in their homes, her evenings are now spent doing schoolwork. 

Working from home has presented a different set of challenges for Mrs. Parsons. With having three kids running around the house with the oldest in fifth grade and the youngest in kindergarten, it can be difficult for Mrs. Parson to find spaces to get things done. 

“Trying to find a place where it’s quiet and make some of the videos is not easy when you have three kids,” said Mrs. Parsons.

Schools have been told to finish this year online. And this has presented difficulties past figuring out new, online lesson plans and resources. 

 “There’s a lot that I miss,” said Parsons “I miss seeing my students and getting to talk to them.”

With the possibility of a second wave of COVID-19 affecting America in the fall, there’s uncertainty on whether or not students will go back at the start of next year.

“My number one thing is, I would try to find a better way to make connections,” said Mrs. Parsons 

Mrs. Parsons’ story is one that many teachers are able to relate too with COVID-19 changing their lives from the largest parts to the minute details.

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